18th Annual Nikkei Games Bowling Event

August 19th , 2017
– Saturday only –
AMF Carter Lanes – Fullerton (Lemon / 91 Freeway)

Features a simple all scratch format by age divisions. Juniors (kids ages 2 – 18) and Adults (19 – ?? “so far 87 is the oldest participant we have had)   are all bowling in their own age divisions – also separated by Men & Women. For team events we have Senior Team divisions and regular women and men divisions (see entry).

For the UNDER 10 kids we have many divisions in each age group , so say the 5 year olds will probably have 4 groups of 3 bowlers, so each bowler will receive a medal (AGES 9 & UNDER ONLY ARE GUARANTEED MEDALS) …… For kids 10 & over , they will be grouped in groups of about 6 or 7 in each age (Top 3 will receive medals) … but, if there are only 4 13 year-olds, then there will only be 4 in that division. Kids ( 8 & Under only) will get the bumpers …….

Every kid ( 9 & UNDER ONLY) is guaranteed a 1st, 2nd or 3rd in their division and a medal. There are many divisions in each age group so all those kids will get a medal …..  kids 10 & OVER have to earn their medals in groups no larger than 7 kids. All Adults will earn medals in groups of no larger than 7 also. Continue reading 18th Annual Nikkei Games Bowling Event

What happened to the biggest bowling centers in the world?

www.BowlingWorldDigital.com
1/07/09 • Japan

CastawaysHotel.jpgIn January 2006 Bowlingdigital reported that the Castaways Hotel in Las Vegas, Nev., formerly known as ‘The Showboat’, was flattened. When the building was demolished on January 11, 2006, the history of the biggest bowling center in the United States with 106 lanes came to an end. Click here to read Frenchy Letourneau’s report.

The Showboat was often called the biggest bowling center in the world but this wasn’t true.

Continue reading What happened to the biggest bowling centers in the world?

100K for 100K — Nisei Support Needed for Postage Stamp

We seek a U.S. commemorative postage stamp that would tell the inspiring story of these American World War II soldiers. Begun by two widows of these veterans and their friend in 2005, this continues to be a volunteer-led, grassroots effort by family and friends of the veterans.

Help today by signing the White House petition. It’s easy. Enter your name, email, and zip (optional). That’s it. The President can make the stamp happen. Tell him today.

100,000 for 100,000.  100,000 signers needed.  120,000 incarcerated in the internment camps (read story below).  We need 100,000 signers by March 18th to get this petition onto the President’s desk.

In honor of the 120,000 who were in the camps, we ask that at least 100,000 supporters of this cause to step forward to sign this petition. We especially ask anyone who has family or friends who served during World War II, and family or friends of those who were in the internment camps. Thank you, and please tell others to sign, too! Maybe people at your church or other organization would like to get involved. Continue reading 100K for 100K — Nisei Support Needed for Postage Stamp

Orange County’s fading bowling alley scene: Just 15 centers remain

Orange County Register
Oct. 25, 2015
Updated Oct. 26, 2015 4:51 p.m.
By BROOKE EDWARDS STAGGS / STAFF WRITER

Members of the Nikkei Seniors toss their balls down the lanes early one morning at the Linbrook Bowling Center in Anaheim. Linbrook, the oldest bowling center in Orange County, was packed with league players on a recent morning. MARK RIGHTMIRE, STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
Members of the Nikkei Seniors toss their balls down the lanes early one morning at the Linbrook Bowling Center in Anaheim. Linbrook, the oldest bowling center in Orange County, was packed with league players on a recent morning. MARK RIGHTMIRE, STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Kristin Pajares was working the snack bar at Tustin Lanes bowling alley in 1984 when 17-year-old Anthony Nitz walked in.

Nitz spied the beautiful girl handing french fries to a customer and became mesmerized. After a week of daily visits, he worked up the

Pauline Fujino, 79, of Santa Ana, a member of the Nikkei Seniors bowling group, does a little dance following her strike early one morning at the Linbrook Bowling Center in Anaheim. MARK RIGHTMIRE, THE OC REGISTER
Pauline Fujino, 79, of Santa Ana, a member of the Nikkei Seniors bowling group, does a little dance following her strike early one morning at the Linbrook Bowling Center in Anaheim. MARK RIGHTMIRE, THE OC REGISTER

nerve to slide a napkin with his phone number across the snack bar. Thinking it was trash, 18-year-old Pajares started to throw the napkin away until Nitz lunged to stop her.

“We spent the majority of the next year and a half at Tustin Lanes, whether it was working for me, bowling, eating or playing video games,” she recalls.

Sumi Yakura, 81, of Westminster and a member of the Nikkei Seniors bowling group, is congratulated for her strike early one morning at the Linbrook Bowling Center in Anaheim. MARK RIGHTMIRE, THE OC REGISTER
Sumi Yakura, 81, of Westminster and a member of the Nikkei Seniors bowling group, is congratulated for her strike early one morning at the Linbrook Bowling Center in Anaheim. MARK RIGHTMIRE, THE OC REGISTER

Continue reading Orange County’s fading bowling alley scene: Just 15 centers remain

Three Historic L.A. Bowling Alleys Go Dark

LA Times
June 16, 2015
Chris Nichols

Like drive-in theaters before them, the last of the larger-than-life classic 1950s bowling centers that once roamed Southern California are nearly extinct. The oversized thrills and colorful frills of Mission Hills Bowl in the San Fernando Valley, Friendly Hills Lanes in Whittier, and Wagon Wheel Bowl in Oxnard all went dark this month.

Crews quickly descended on the mid-century buildings to scavenge for valuables. At least the maple lanes from Mission Hills, originally designed by Vegas architect Martin Stern, Jr., will see more strikes at a bowling center in Vietnam. The Wagon Wheel was the last vestige of a once-thriving roadside amusement along the 101 that is now completely shuttered. Friendly Hills is a modern masterpiece from architects Powers, Daly, and DeRosa, who reinvented the bowling center after WWII. It featured a beauty parlor, coffee shop, and the Mayan Room lounge alongside the 32 lanes.

Continue reading Three Historic L.A. Bowling Alleys Go Dark